Policyholder

Welcome to our Policyholder section from here you can click on your desired Policyholder image and use the Policyholder picture embed code to add to your blogs, forums, websites and other online media. The embed code contains all necessary CC attribution, that are mandatory to include, so you don't need to contribute the image authors manually. If you want, you can customize your Policyholder embed code: resize the Policyholder image as well as select the position in which you would like it to appear on in your article. It's then simply a case of copying the short code and pasting the Policyholder code into your post.

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All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and other reference data is for informational purposes only. This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.A policyholder is a person or entity who owns an insurance policy and has the privilege to exercise the rights stated in the contract. This party is often, but not always, the insured, and may or may not be one of the policy's beneficiaries.

Wiki info

Often a commercial insured's liability insurance program consists of several layers. The first layer of insurance generally consists of primary insurance, which provides first dollar indemnity for judgments and settlements up to the limits of liability of the primary policy. Generally, primary insurance is subject to a deductible and obligates the insured to defend the insured against lawsuits, which is normally accomplished by assigning counsel to defend the insured. In many instances, a commercial insured may elect to self-insure. Above the primary insurance or self-insured retention, the insured may have one or more layers of excess insurance to provide coverage additional limits of indemnity protection. There are a variety of types of excess insurance, including "stand-alone" excess policies (policies that contain their own terms, conditions, and exclusions), "follow form" excess insurance (policies that follow the terms of the underlying policy except as specifically provided), and "umbrella" insurance policies (excess insurance that in some circumstances could provide coverage that is broader than the underlying insurance).